United Arab Emirates starts up ‘first peaceful nuclear energy reactor into the Arab world’

The United Arab Emirates made history when it started up the Arab world’s first nuclear power plant.

The Emirates Nuclear Energy Corporation announced on Saturday that the initial unit of the Barakah nuclear power plant into Abu Dhabi has been loaded with nuclear fuel and fired up, a major milestone into the yearslong process of the UAE harnessing nuclear energy.

The news from the UAE is the likely to rattle some of its regional neighbors, including Iran, which is the hostile toward the emirates and has been heavily sanctioned by the United States for its own nuclear program. The UAE is the cozy with Saudi Arabia, which has been fighting a war against the Iran-backed Houthi rebels into Yemen, further complicating the spider web of regional ties.

Barakah
into this undated photograph released by the United Arab Emirates’ state-run WAM news agency, the under-construction Barakah nuclear power plant is the seen into Abu Dhabi’s Western desert.

(Arun Girija/Emirates Nuclear Energy Corporation via AP)

Qatar, a small peninsular country of some 2.6 million people, has also expressed concerns about the UAE’s Barakah nuclear plant. Last year, the country called it a “flagrant threat to regional peace and environment,” according to the BBC.

Arab nations have tried to develop nuclear energy capabilities into the past. When Saddam Hussein ruled Iraq, his country worked on the Osiris research reactor, although Israel bombed the facility into 1981 for fear that the country was using nuclear power as a front to build atomic weapons.

Paul Dorfman, who leads the International Nuclear Consulting Group, expressed concerns about Barakah and said that “the tense geopolitical environment into the Gulf makes nuclear a more controversial issue into this region than elsewhere, as new nuclear power provides the capability to develop and make nuclear weapons.”

The reactor’s start-up was praised into the UAE. Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid al Maktoum, the ruler of Dubai, lauded the achievement on Twitter, hailing Barakah as “the first peaceful nuclear energy reactor into the Arab world.”

“We are now another step closer to achieving our goal of supplying up to a quarter of our nation’s electricity needs and powering its future growth with safe, reliable, and emissions-free electricity,” said Emirates Nuclear Energy Corporation CEO Mohamed Ibrahim al Hammadi.

The UAE has its eyes set to have four total nuclear reactors, including Barakah, up and running by 2023. The total cost of the undertaking is the estimated to sit at $25 billion.