The Undertaker talks the differences between old school and new school wrestling

The Undertaker did an interview with Vicente Beltrán of ViBe & Wrestling to promote his “Final Farewell” at Sunday’s Survivor Series pay-per-view event.

During the interview, he was asked about the differences between old school and new school wrestling.

He started out by noting that he thinks athletes today are amazing in terms of what they can do physically.

“I think that the disconnection or the problem is that they rely too much on their athletic ability and the things they can do in the ring instead of trying to develop the layers of their characters. I was talked to Bruce Prichard on the phone a couple of days ago and I told him how much I like the rivalry between Roman Reigns and Jey Uso, because it’s an old-fashioned kind of rivalry. It is very easy to understand, especially if you are familiar with the Samoan heritage and linage and how proud Samoans are of family status, especially in this world of professional wrestling.”

He stated having the understanding of their background and having them grow up together then fighting each other shows how many layers that storyline has. He also thinks it’s the closest thing to old school that WWE has done in a long time. He praised them for doing a great job with that storyline.

“I think the big difference is that you don’t have those rich characters to believe in. A lot of people used to tell me: “I don’t understand, were you dead or were you alive?” They were so committed to the character and I think that’s the most important thing: the story and the character development.

I think they all have twisted their priorities in what they are doing in the sense that they are so athletic and they have these amazing matches, that they should, but it’s always about storytelling, the good versus the evil… that’s what’s really important and that’s what makes people invested in what you do; it’s always about the story.”

You can watch the entire interview by clicking on the player below:

 

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