Parents of $33,000-a-year private school boys stand up for their kids after muck up day scandal

Parents whose sons attend the private school embroiled in a Year 12 Muck Up scandal have jumped to their defence on social media.

Shore School on Sydney’s lower north shore was forced to go into damage control after a document detailing a muck up day scavenger hunt circulated among Year 12 students was leaked to the public earlier this week.

Titled the ‘Triwizard Shorenament’ – a reference to Harry Potter – students were encouraged to participate in a series of activities such as spitting on a homeless man, breaking into Taronga Zoo and taking drugs.

Mothers who send their sons to the $33,000 a year school have since taken a stand by uploading photos of their boys in private Facebook and Instagram groups.

Parents who send their boys to Shore School (pictured) have taken a stand to stick up for their sons on social media after the school was embroiled in controversy this week

Parents who send their boys to Shore School (pictured) have taken a stand to stick up for their sons on social media after the school was embroiled in controversy this week

Photos were tagged with hashtag #ProudShoreMums, along with blue and white heart emojis to represent the school’s colours, the Sydney Morning Herald reported.

The posts were in response to the social and media attacks their boys have been under since the muck up antics were exposed.

Parents claim their sons as young as primary school-aged are being harassed by the media for interviews for interviews and abused by the public on their way to and from school.

‘So many boys have been getting verbally abused, screamed at by the public. They are all happy it’s school holidays,’ one primary school mother told the publication. 

Parents have also been forced to stick up for their sons in Facebook groups following the backlash facing the school.

‘I wanted to remind people that not all of the year 12 boys at Shore were involved in this and that it’s unfair to generalise,’ one parent posted, according to the Herald.  

‘I think the way decent boys are being spoken about is unfair and actually could harm their attitudes to women.’ 

The hashtag has since sparked backlash and further debate on social media, with many blaming the parents.

Doting parents posted photos of their sons in Shore school uniform, along with blue and white heart emojis and the hashtag #ProudShoreMums. Pictured are students in school uniform

Doting parents posted photos of their sons in Shore school uniform, along with blue and white heart emojis and the hashtag #ProudShoreMums. Pictured are students in school uniform

‘These Shore School mothers show the reason why there’s a problem with kids, these kids are allowed to get away with anything including plans that involve spitting on the homeless, rape and drug taking. Society is already paying for a lot of s*** parenting,’ one person wrote on Twitter.

Another added: ‘#ProudShoreMums are not in the best position to identify the corrosive effect of the privilege they instill in their children and pay for by sending their them to private school. To say that this blight extends right across the North Shore is absolutely correct and no excuse.’ 

Another asked how parents plan to fix this ‘appalling, entitled, privileged behaviour?’

‘Teach humility?’ the man added.

Shore headmaster Timothy Petterson said he was aware of parents concerns of the their of sons being identified as Shore students in public along with ‘disturbing comments’ on social media.

He addressed the muck saga in a letter to parents last week, saying the student involved in preparing the document ‘appear to be a small number, not representative of the wider year group’.

Students were also filmed (pictured) in a TikTok video mocking western Sydney suburbs, such as Blacktown and Mount Druitt, as being full of 'druggos'

Students were also filmed (pictured) in a TikTok video mocking western Sydney suburbs, such as Blacktown and Mount Druitt, as being full of ‘druggos’ 

The #ProudShoreMums hashtag has sparked further outrage and debate on social media

The #ProudShoreMums hashtag has sparked further outrage and debate on social media

The exclusive school has been hit with fresh claims of systemic abuse, bullying and homophobia in the wake of the muck up day scandal.

Former students have come forward, claiming a ‘hyper masculine’ culture has been brewing for years that serves students, teachers and parents with ‘elitist’ values.

Matt Godden told Daily Mail Australia the culture among the teachers allowed years of student bullying to go undetected as he was punched and called homophobic slurs such as ‘f****t’. 

‘There was verbal abuse, pushing, shoving, messing up, or grabbing and pulling around by the hair,’ he said.

‘Things that might seem inconsequential, that if you were to complain might be dismissed with some platitude about hardening up, or standing up for yourself.

‘The teachers’ attitudes, were, in my opinion, contributors to it.’ 

Mr Godden said in a series of tweets he had graduated in 1992 and the trauma from the bullying had led him to have a mental breakdown and almost drop out of school two weeks before sitting the Higher School Certificate. 

‘Constantly hunted in corridors, and grabbed by the hair, and hurled around, and against walls, labelled a ‘f****t’, for the crime of a haircut,’ he tweeted.

‘Yes, apparently, there are ‘gay’ haircuts.’

Mr Godden said he did not identify as a homosexual and that something as small as his haircut was enough to draw unwanted attention from students and teachers alike.   

He claimed one teacher openly disliked him and would make condescending comments about his appearance. 

‘He pointed at my haircut, which so offended him, and said, ‘Next year, I’m going to get you. Next year, you’re mine!”.

Mr Godden said one boy regularly pulled him by the hair and threw him to the ground and shoved him against the wall.

After a particularly bad beating, Mr Godden says the bully was given a soft punishment.

‘The sum total of repercussions he received was a 3 hour Saturday Detention, which some other students implored me to plead that he be allowed to forego,’ he said.  

Mr Godden claimed teachers often overlooked the bullying over fears of repercussion.

‘Gay teachers had said nothing, had watched the abuse, and done nothing, for fear of their own careers,’ he tweeted. 

Mr Godden also claimed there were even some teachers who took part in the bullying culture.  

‘We had an insane teacher,’ he said. 

‘He would punch the desk hard enough to make the windows rattle to get the class’s attention.

‘If he caught a boy not paying attention, he would creep up to them, like a ninja, and physically lift them out of their seat by the hair where sideburns (that were not allowed) would grow.’ 

Mr Godden said the experience forced him to skip school just so he would avoid the bullies.

‘I probably had higher than average absenteeism,’ he said. 

Younger students from Shore School (pictured) have been harassed by the media and abused on their way to and from school

 Younger students from Shore School (pictured) have been harassed by the media and abused on their way to and from school

Students were also filmed in a TikTok video mocking western Sydney suburbs as being full of ‘druggos’.

In the now deleted TikTok interview, a group of four Shore School students were asked to name the worst suburb in Sydney. 

‘Blacktown,’ the four boys answer in unison.

When asked to elaborate one said ‘because its Blacktown’, before another answered ‘druggos’.

Another pair of mates were asked the same question, with one replying: ‘The worst is Bankstown… too many ‘eshays’ who’ll roll you’.

An eshay refers to a Sydney subculture of young criminals who tend to wear bumbags and sneakers, and are usually considered to be from battler suburbs.

The exception among the group was one boy who said the worst suburb ‘is Mosman because all the rich kids live there’. 

Shore headmaster Timothy Petterson has addressed the scandal in a letter to parents

Shore headmaster Timothy Petterson has addressed the scandal in a letter to parents

The ‘rule book’ – detailed by students in a PDF documents – reveals plans to meet at a park on the lower north shore on the night before the traditional celebrations.

Year 12 students would be split into teams of five or six before carrying out a series of tasks to gain the most points. 

Some challenges are illegal, such as ‘snort a line’ (of cocaine) or ‘rip a cone on the Harbour Bridge’ (smoke cannabis out of a bong).

Others dare students to ‘break into Taronga Zoo’, ‘spit on a homeless man’, and ‘sh** on a train’.

Some involve assaulting total strangers by hitting them in the genitals while they are walking past.

The list of challenges also denigrates women, urging students to have sex with a woman over 80kg or hook up with an unattractive women deemed ‘3/10 or lower’. 

Others tasks include getting mullet haircuts and waxing armpit hair.  

Instructions written into the rule book advise students they must document their completed tasks on Instagram.

But they are also warned not to upload any potentially incriminating evidence of illegal behaviour including ‘inappropriate or sexual advances’.

The scavenger hunt limits Year 12 students from competing in the tournament outside Sydney's CBD and the city's lower north shore (pictured)

The scavenger hunt limits Year 12 students from competing in the tournament outside Sydney’s CBD and the city’s lower north shore (pictured)

The 'official rule and challenge book' - created by students in a PDF document - revealed they planned to meet between 5 and 6pm on Wednesday at Waverton Park for the series of 'treacherous' challenges

The ‘official rule and challenge book’ – created by students in a PDF document – revealed they planned to meet between 5 and 6pm on Wednesday at Waverton Park for the series of ‘treacherous’ challenges

The 'rule book' - detailed by students in a PDF documents - reveals plans to meet at a park on the lower north shore on the night before the traditional celebrations

The ‘rule book’ – detailed by students in a PDF documents – reveals plans to meet at a park on the lower north shore on the night before the traditional celebrations 

‘If anyone gets caught by a teacher/cops they will say that they were just having fun between the 5/6 of them and won’t mention the tournament,’ the instructions state.          

A stern warning has since been issued to students and parents.

‘As soon as the school became aware of the document police were informed and an urgent communication was sent to all year 12 parents instructing that under no circumstances are Shore boys to participate in the activities specified,’ a school spokesman said. 

‘Consequences for any boys who do participate will be severe and could include the loss of their place at the school.’ 

Daily Mail Australia contacted Shore School for comment.

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk