Inside the year-long effort to get British-Australian academic Kylie Moore-Gilbert out of Iran jail

Inside the year-long effort to get Australian academic Kylie Moore-Gilbert out of hellhole Iranian jail – as a top intelligence chief’s secret tactics are revealed

  • Australian academic Kylie Moore-Gilbert finally released from an Iranian jail
  • She was serving a ten-year sentence on trumped-up espionage charges
  • Prime Minister Scott Morrison wouldn’t confirm if release was part of a swap deal
  • Intelligence officials had been working secretly for months on the release 
  • Ambassador to Thailand said to have lobbied local officials to release prisoners
  • Iranian prisoners were crucial to securing the lecturer’s freedom, sources say 

It took 12 months of intense lobbying behind the scenes, but ultimately Nick Warner secured the release of Australian academic Kylie Moore-Gilbert from an Iranian jail.

Mr Warner, the head of Australia’s intelligence community, successfully negotiated an apparent prisoner swap deal with Iran.

Doctor Moore-Gilbert was serving a ten year sentence on trumped-up espionage charges, and had been in jail since September 2018.

Mr Warner is understood to have used his extensive contacts in ongoing discussions with the Iranian regime, according to The Australian.

Meanwhile Australia’s ambassador to Thailand, Allan McKinnon, lobbied with Thai officials to release three Iranian terrorists as an ­exchange for the Melbourne University lecturer.

Dr Moore-Gilbert finally left prison on Wednesday and was flown home following a gruelling 804 days in some of Iran’s toughest jails, where she also spent time in solitary confinement.

Kylie Moore-Gilbert (pictured above) spent more than two years behind bars in Iran after she was convicted of espionage offences

Kylie Moore-Gilbert (pictured above) spent more than two years behind bars in Iran after she was convicted of espionage offences

Her family said they were ‘relieved and ecstatic’ while the lecturer herself expressed her ‘love and admiration for the great nation of Iran and its warm-­hearted, generous and brave ­people’.

The three terrorists ­arrived back in their home country after being released by authorities in Thailand, where they were alleged to have plotted the murder of Israeli diplomats in Bangkok.

Multiple senior sources confirmed Dr Moore-Gilbert’s release owed thanks to a meticulously planned diplomacy agreement between Australia, Iran and Thailand. 

‘Nick (Warner) has been a central player to this,’ a source said. ‘He knows the Iranian political system, and he has built crucial connections with the people who run the country.’ 

Diplomatic sources confirmed ambassador Mr McKinnon was also a key figure in the strategy, knowing that the release of the Thai prisoners would be essential to secure her freedom.

He is understood to have spent months convincing people in meetings and even at social functions to get the Thai prisoners released – who the Iranian government called ‘businessmen’. 

Prime Minister Scott Morrison refused to confirm whether the men were part of a swap for Dr Moore-Gilbert.

He said that commenting on the circumstances of Dr Moore-Gilbert’s release could endanger ‘other Australians who may find themselves in this situation’.

Dr Moore-Gilbert (pictured) described her release as 'bittersweet' despite the injustices she was subjected to in Iran

Dr Moore-Gilbert (pictured) described her release as ‘bittersweet’ despite the injustices she was subjected to in Iran

Dr Moore-Gilbert, an Islamic studies lecturer, was arrested at Tehran Airport in September 2018 by the intelligence arm of the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps as she attempted to leave the country. 

She was subsequently convicted on a string of espionage offences, and sentenced to ten years jail. 

Despite her harrowing ordeal, Dr Moore-Gilbert refuses to blame Iran’s people for her wrongful imprisonment.

‘It is with bittersweet feelings that I depart your country, despite the injustices which I have been subjected to,’ she said.

‘I came to Iran as a friend and with friendly intentions, and ­depart Iran with those sentiments not only still intact, but strengthened.’ 

Prime Minister Morrison also commended ­Defence Minister Marise Payne and Australia’s ambassador Lyndall Sachs for their joint efforts to secure the academic’s release, as well as ‘other agencies who have supported this incredibly important task.’

Dr Gilbert-Moore will now quarantine for two weeks following her arrival back home.

Nick Warner, the head of Australia's intelligence community, (pictured above) was a key player in the release of Dr Kylie Moore-Gilbert from an Iranian jail, reports suggest

Nick Warner, the head of Australia’s intelligence community, (pictured above) was a key player in the release of Dr Kylie Moore-Gilbert from an Iranian jail, reports suggest

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This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk