Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison Covid quarantine in board shorts after Japan trips

Scott Morrison’s 14-day mandatory Covid quarantine involves several ‘zones’ and a complicated WhatsApp messaging system which dictates which room he is allowed to be in at any given time.

The Australian Prime Minister is four days into his two week isolation period after making a business trip to Japan last week.

He is quarantining in The Lodge, and still has the benefit of utilising staff – including cleaners, cooks and security, despite being unable to speak with them face-to-face.

The Lodge is divided into a ‘red zone’, ‘yellow zone’ and ‘drop zone’ – each with their own policies and strict lists detailing who is allowed to enter each area.

The Australian Prime Minister is four days into his two week isolation period after making a business trip to Japan last week. Pictured getting his first Covid test

The Australian Prime Minister is four days into his two week isolation period after making a business trip to Japan last week. Pictured getting his first Covid test

Mr Morrison and his personal photographer, Adam Taylor, are the only people allowed to enter the designated red zone, which comprises of his bedroom and meeting rooms.

This is where Mr Morrison spends most of his time in lockdown, holding Zoom meetings wearing a blazer and tie with board shorts and thongs beneath the scope of the camera. 

He has attended several virtual summits, broadcasts and parliamentary business meetings since entering quarantine.

The red zone is stocked with fresh linen, towels, toiletries and cleaning supplies for the duo to use.

When he isn't working, Mr Morrison tries to catch up on exercise. 'There is a bike here. I just go for 30 minutes. I try not to go too hard, although my brother Allan is a paramedic,' he joked

When he isn’t working, Mr Morrison tries to catch up on exercise. ‘There is a bike here. I just go for 30 minutes. I try not to go too hard, although my brother Allan is a paramedic,’ he joked

Meanwhile the yellow zone has a little more flexibility with staff.

The yellow zone includes the kitchen and laundry, so staff within these areas are able to enter.

Meanwhile, the drop zone is open to more staff again, though Mr Morrison can’t be present while they arrive.

Australian Federal Police who guard the premises are able to deposit and collect essential items and documents via the dropzone, but organise with Mr Morrison via a WhatsApp message to ensure he is not in the room at the time.

Instead, he is then told when the documents are ready to collect and the room is empty.

Mr Morrison spends most of his time in lockdown, holding Zoom meetings wearing a blazer and tie with board shorts and thongs beneath the scope of the camera

Mr Morrison spends most of his time in lockdown, holding Zoom meetings wearing a blazer and tie with board shorts and thongs beneath the scope of the camera

Mr Morrison’s dirty laundry must be placed in a water-soluble laundry bag before it is moved to the drop zone, while staff handling his laundry and crockery must wear face masks, shields and gloves while cleaning. 

 The prime minister will be joined by another staff member in quarantine next week, who will also be subjected to several Covid tests.

If he tests negative again, Mr Morrison will be free to leave quarantine in 10 days.

If any of the men test positive, they will begin the quarantine period again. 

While mandatory hotel quarantine has been subject to criticism, with countless returned travellers picking apart the system, Mr Morrison said he isn’t struggling to complete the stay and is ‘keeping busy’.

‘It’s actually pretty busy,’ he said.

Mr Morrison and his personal photographer, Adam Taylor, are the only people allowed to enter the designated red zone, which comprises of his bedroom and meeting rooms

Mr Morrison and his personal photographer, Adam Taylor, are the only people allowed to enter the designated red zone, which comprises of his bedroom and meeting rooms

‘Last night we had APEC until 2.30am. There are announcements and briefings and a lot of paperwork. I almost live behind four walls with a guard and a lot of my movements are closely controlled so it’s not that different.’

He said he was struggling with not being able to see his children or family, but said he speaks with them several times a day.   

When he isn’t working, Mr Morrison tries to catch up on exercise. 

‘There is a bike here. I just go for 30 minutes. I try not to go too hard, although my brother Allan is a paramedic,’ he joked.

He said he’s also found a puzzle in his daughter’s room, and has been using that to keep busy, along with working his way through all the streaming services. 

‘But the working bit covers most of the day,’ he said.

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk